Acupressure near me An Analysis

Acupressure is a technique used in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) that is quite similar to acupuncture. Instead of needles, instruments or fingers apply direct pressure on specific points of the body in order to alleviate symptoms or to support various organs or systems of the body.Learn more about us at Acupressure near me

Acupressure is widely used in Asia, but it hasn’t been fully accepted by the Western medical establishment. Part of the reason is that Western medicine uses science as the predominant method for determining whether a practice or therapy is effective. For most of acupressure’s history, it has relied on non-scientific word of mouth for its positive reputation.

In recent years, however, both Eastern and Western medicine have worked together to scientifically test the efficacy of this form of physical therapy. Today I’m going to share some of the current findings on this ancient practice. In particular, I want to focus on chronic conditions that may benefit from this safe and natural practice.

Acupressure vs. Dysmenorrhea

Dysmenorrhea refers to a pain condition that accompanies a woman’s monthly cycle. Most women experience some degree of pain and discomfort during that time of the month. But in the case of dysmenorrhea, the pain is classified as being severe and often debilitating.

A Korean study, in the International Journal of Nursing Studies, set out to determine whether acupressure could help alleviate some of the more acute effects of dysmenorrhea.

58 college-aged women participated in this experiment. Half of the women were subjected to a course of acupressure to a specific point, known as the “SP6 acupoint”. The other half were used as a “control” group, to help provide a comparison to the acupressure treatment group.

The treatment group received acupressure within 8 hours of menstruation. The researchers measured the symptoms relating to dysmenorrhea before the acupressure was applied, 30 minutes afterward and also at the 1, 2 and 3 hour mark – following the administration of acupressure.

The researchers found that there was a significant reduction in the severity of symptoms immediately after treatment. The effect appeared to last for up to 2 hours after the treatment ended.

As a result of these findings, the authors concluded that acupressure, “can be an effective non-invasive nursing intervention for alleviation of primary dysmenorrhea, with effects lasting 2h post treatment.”

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